Shelf Shot 9

Especially in these times, I enjoy poetry. I get enjoyment, inspiration and lots to think about, as well as the pleasure of rereading favorites. I have several shelves of poetry, here is one.

The Dylan has the lyrics to almost all of his songs, many of which I consider poetry. Doris Peel was a favorite poet of my mother’s and this slim volume has some nice things in it. Then we come to Poe. I’ve had this Modern Library edition since I was in high school, and it’s still the only one I have or need. I’ve read it more than once, but mostly I just dip in here and there.

I bought the Carl Sandberg collections when I was visiting his home in Flat Rock, North Carolina. I’ve enjoyed his poetry since I first read it in high school. Next is Robert Service. I bought it for the few poems I liked at the time, and have gone on to read a lot of others, but I am by no means near reading the entire collection.

William Edgar Stafford was an American poet and pacifist. He was the father of poet and essayist Kim Stafford. He was appointed the twentieth Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress in 1970. He lived his last years in Lake Oswego, OR.

Everyone is doubtless familiar with Whitman’s Leaves of Grass and the poems of Longfellow, the next two volumes. Perhaps less familiar is Frederick Louis MacNeice, an Irish poet and playwright from Northern Ireland, and a member of the Auden Group. I take this book in hand when I want something thought-provoking.

The rest, well, that’s what Google is for. Do you read poetry?

About Richard Robinson

Enjoying life in Portland, OR
This entry was posted in Books & Reading, Poetry, Shelf Shots. Bookmark the permalink.

25 Responses to Shelf Shot 9

  1. tracybham says:

    The only poet that I have on my shelves is E. E. Cummings. I also like Emily Dickinson’s poems. I have read some poems by Philip Larkin that I like. I should look for collections by both of those.

    We also have old editions of The Oxford Book of American Verse and The Oxford Book of English Verse. I should pull those out and see what’s in there. It has been a while since I looked through them.

  2. Steve Oerkfitz says:

    Love Bob Dylan . Not much of a poetry reader. New Matt Goldman this week.

  3. Cap'n Bob Napier says:

    I’ve read poetry but I don’t read poetry.

  4. Guy says:

    Hi I love poetry, I feature quotes on most of the posts to my nature blog. I will use the link to it below. I have an absurd number of books even after getting rid of a box to my sister in law. One of my favourite poets is Willian Stafford who is on your shelf there. Others are Ted Kooser and Mary Oliver. Lately I have bought a number of Canadian Poetry books from the 1950’s.

    Happy Reading
    Guy

  5. Jeff Meyerson says:

    Nope. Never have really enjoyed poetry at all. Bad teaching had something to do with it, but it is mostly me.

  6. Patti Abbott says:

    I used to have a lot of poetry books. I tried to write it for a while but realized I would need to study it in order to write it. I like Mary Oliver, Anne Sexton, Sylvia Plath, Theodore Roethke, E.E. Cummings, Emily Dickinson, May Sarton, and a bunch more. I won a contest as a student and the prize was they published a chapbook of my poetry. Most of it is pretty lousy. As I said, I needed to study it more.

  7. Chuck Litka says:

    Except for that E E Cummings piece about puddles, I can’t say I recall any poetry that I may have been taught. I have written one poem, however, which I’ll share. (To be read out loud in a whinny voice.)
    Who is that old man in the mirror?
    Where did he come from?
    Why won’t he go?

  8. I read poetry from time to time. And, I took a couple Poetry classes in College and when I was working on my PhD. I’m fond of Wallace Stevens, W. H. Auden, and Emily Dickinson.

  9. My PhD is in English, but I have an MBA, MA, and MLS, too.

  10. Yes, Rick, I have more degrees than a thermometer!

  11. My entire spring and summer have been dominated by the work of Mary Oliver. I’ve picked up 7 books of her work, poetry and essays, and most mornings part of my routine is to read on the deck and at least one or two Mary Oliver works are always part of that.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s